Knowledge.

Everyone knows the quote, "knowledge is power." 

Until you are aware of something or have the knowledge about it, you cannot do anything about it. But the thing is, you have to be open to that knowledge and accepting of it - whatever it may be - in order to change or grow. Sometimes we tune things out simply because we don't want to hear it. Sometimes it's because we want to pretend it isn't true, sometimes we want to think we have a better way of doing things, and sometimes we just aren't open to straying from the norm. 

I myself am very guilty at times of having selective acceptance of knowledge. We all are. It makes us human. But I want to applaud all of those in the basis of Cancer who are open minded and accepting of ALL possible cures, those researchers who are willing to go beyond what seems "normal." 

I am so happy that some awareness of completely non-toxic Cancer treatments are being brought to attention. I am NOT saying that chemotherapy and radiation are not good sources of Cancer treatment in some cases. Both of them have saved lives and have worked in numerous cases. BUT it is pretty cool to know and be aware that there are OTHER options as a Cancer patient. Which is something I was never told in any oncology appointment in the Midwest, I had to do some researching to gain knowledge and awareness for myself. What is completely and miraculously wonderful is that university hospitals around the country are starting to accept the idea that other methods could work and try them out, to gain the knowledge from them. Perhaps for those patients who do not tolerate the chemo, those patients who are "too far gone," or those patients like me who feel that they need a different way to heal their bodies as a whole can sleep better at night knowing THEY HAVE OPTIONS. 

The University of Iowa makes me even more proud to be a Hawkeye with this article. THANK YOU for being open, and spreading the knowledge and awareness. 

Go Hawks!

http://www.kcrg.com/subject/news/university-of-iowa-researchers-taking-second-look-at-vitamin-c-for-cancer-treatment-20150413